Hyundai Tucson Review & Ratings


Hyundai launched Tucson SUV in India priced at Rs 22.24 lakh (on-road price, New Delhi) in petrol and diesel variants, with a 2WD drivetrain. Missing out on the AWD version, Hyundai will soon add the AWD drivetrain to the carline in May 2017. The all-wheel drive system on the new Tucson will be the Active On-Demand 4WD with 50/50 front and rear lock mode system and it will be offered with the 2.0 litre, four cylinder CRDi unit. Additionally, it will get an all-black interior with a panoramic sunroof. Hyundai Tucson re-entered the Indian market in November 2016 after the premium SUV was phased out in 2010. The new Hyundai Tucson is positioned between Creta and Santa-Fe in Hyundai India’s SUV line-up. Currently in third generation, the 2016 Hyundai Tucson is built on the Fluidic Sculpture 2.0 design philosophy and features multiple design elements that accentuate the imposing exterior profile. The Hyundai Tucson India-spec model is available with a choice of two engines and two transmissions in a total of five variants.


Hyundai’s ‘Fluidic’ design philosophy was a runaway hit when it was showcased to Indian customers with cars such as the Verna and the Elantra. Over the years, the language itself has evolved to suit conservative tastes and has been distancing itself from bold and distinctive design traits.The new Tucson is based on the evolutionary ‘Fluidic 2.0’ theme, that mixes the curvy overtones of the older Hyundais with cleaner lines. In terms of size, the Tucson fits in right between Creta and the Santa Fe. The overall theme of design is a mix and match of its SUV siblings too. Up front, it gets Hyundai’s signature cascading grille, that takes up a bulk of the real estate. There’s a nice hint of aggression to the face, courtesy the rounded headlamps, the large mock intakes and the positioning of the daytime running lamps and the foglamps. The top-spec Tucson will feature a dual-barrel LED lighting setup, which we think looks super cool. Lower trims will get a standard projector headlamp setup. Adding to the aggression are the crisp lines on the bonnet and the wheel arches that flare outwards. We particularly like how Hyundai hasn’t gone overboard with the usage of chrome on the Tucson (especially at the front) and chosen to keep things classy.

Round to the side, the Tucson seems a notch curvier than the Creta thanks to the rounded wheel arches. None the less, it does feature the sharp shoulder line – which has become synonymous with Hyundai designs – that emanates from the front fender and runs across the length of the car. The massive 18-inch diamond cut alloy wheels fill up the wheel wells nicely and are wrapped with chunky 225/55R18 tyres. Again, we love the tasteful use of chrome here that highlights the window line that tapers towards the C-pillar, and the little dabs on the door handles. NeatThe rear profile does instil a sense of deja vu. While a few will feel it looks like an overgrown Active i20, most will draw parallels to the large Santa Fe. The rear has been kept fuss-free, with the large wraparound taillamps grabbing most of the attention. Just like the headlamps, these get the LED treatment as well. The customary matte-black cladding, the faux skidplate finished in matte silver and the twin-tip chrome exhausts compliment the butch looks rather well.


On the inside, the Tucson looks more Hyundai Creta than Santa Fe. The Creta’s cabin is a good place to begin with but upgraders will expect something more and distinct. There is a two-tone black and beige dash with a distinct separation between the dual zone HVAC and the entertainment unit. Speaking of which is an 8-inch touchscreen like the one in the Elantra, with both Android Auto and Apple CarPlay. Thankfully, there are also knobs and dials for a few of the functions. The dials are crisp to read and have a 4.2-inch colour screen between them for trip computer and other info. Below the HVAC are two power sockets and one USB slot, but in today’s connected times, it should have been the other way around. Interestingly, the higher-spec car gets a slightly different centre console floorpan with an extra cubby hole and a larger central console box. The multi-function steering wheel is leather-wrapped as are the seats, armrests and transmission knob.

Interior space is generous and the legroom at the rear is very impressive. Furthermore the rear seat backs also recline, the only thing is that the rear seats are set quite low and thus with window line higher than usual your view outside is slightly reduced.   The boot is large with 513 litres of storage. It can be accessed with the auto-opening feature ala Elantra, where it pops open if you stand near with the key on you. But just like the Elantra we had trouble getting this to work all the time. The boot can be extended with a 60:40 split rear seat.The all-automatic cars have six airbags, with the manual one getting just two. ABS with EBD are standard and the top trim gets electronic stability control, hill start and brake assist along with downhill brake control. Parking sensors are present for the front and rear, along with a rear camera view.


Hyundai offers two engines and two gearboxes. The 2.0-litre petrol is the same motor from the Elantra but in a higher state of tune (155PS compared to 152PS) and comes with either a six-speed manual or automatic. However, the more exciting news is the new 2.0-litre turbo diesel that also offers the same choice of manual and automatic gearboxes. Given how creamy smooth and linear Hyundai’s current diesels are, expectations are high. Initial impressions are good with 185PS and 400Nm, numbers right up there with European motors in more expensive machines. Push the start button and you’ll notice that the engine sounds a little louder than the 1.6-litre Hyundai diesel from the outside. However, excellent sound deadening ensures things stay smooth and relatively quiet in the cabin when the doors are shut

The engine offers a linear power spread and is decently free-revving but I found no need to cross 4,000rpm, riding the large wave of torque is the way to go. We drove the six-speed torque converter automatic and discovered an able and willing partner but not the fastest unit out there. Shifts are quite quick and seamless but the gearbox takes a tiny moment to respond to inputs on the throttle when the vehicle is coasting. This is because it is eager to drop revs to idle when the driver lifts off the throttle. The act of the gearbox re-engaging when the driver gets back on the accelerator is what causes the delay. It’s a fuel saving measure that persists in both Eco and Sport mode.Elaborating on the two modes, Eco dulls throttle response and encourages the gearbox to shift up early early while Sport offers sharper responses to inputs from the right foot and ensures the gearbox holds gears longer. There are no paddle shifters but manual shifting is possible through the gear selector. The manuals don’t get these modes but instead offer adjustment for steering weight, called Flex Steer.


The Tucson has a pliant ride overall, however there is some scope of improvement. It handles well with minimum body roll. the Tucson suspension has rebound dampers which hep controlling body roll. However, the low speed ride gets harsh. What we like is that the steering is weighted and it not very light as in some other Hyundais. However, there is still some kind of disconnect and it doesn’t feel as confidence inspiring as some of the competition.The Tucson may not entice the enthusiastic driver but it is still good for normal driving and manages well even at high speeds. The brakes are good but they do tend to bite suddenly, something which we had also experienced in the Creta.


For safety, dual airbags, ABS with EBD, ISOFIX, rear parking sensors and a rear camera come as standard. While the AT ‘GL’ variant gets front parking sensors plus side and curtain airbags too, only the range-topping ‘GLS’ grade gets ESC, vehicle stability management, brake-assist, hill-hold and hill-descent control.


The 2017 Hyundai Tucson is a good package and can be a great choice for someone who wants a 5-seater SUV and doesn’t mind having only 2WD. The Tucson is definitely priced a bit on the costlier side and even though it should be rivalling the Mahindra XUV500 and Honda CR-V, don’t be surprised if people start comparisons with the Ford Endeavour and Toyota Fortuner. The Tucson isn’t an out-and-out proper SUV but more of a soft-roader, and it should definitely be your pick if you want a nice diesel SUV that isn’t as large as the Endeavour or Fortuner.

Hyundai Tucson Ex Showroom Price in Gurgaon ranges from  17,98,709/- (Tucson Nu 2.0 6 Speed Manual Base) to 25,17,979/- (Tucson R 2.0 6 Speed Automatic GLS).Hyundai Tucson has 5 Variants of Petrol are available in India. Hyundai Tucson comes in 5 colours, namely Wine Red,Phantom Black,Sleek Silver,Pure White,Star Dust.

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